Battle of Vienne (1429)
Artistic rendition of the battle (c.1602)
 
Date 4 June 1429
Location Vienne, Dauphiné Viennois
Result Decisive Angevin victory
Belligerents
Leaders and commanders
Strength
  • Roughly 15,000
  • Over 8,000
Casualties and losses
  • 273–312 knights
  • Roughly 1500 other infantrymen
  • Only 442 knights and 3,018 other infantrymen are recored to have died; a majority of Charles' forces surrendered after the king's death

The Battle of Vienne (1429) was a significant victory for Henry V of England in the closing days of the succession war for France.

The battle itself was fought near the French city of Vienne in Dauphiné Viennois in the south of France on 4 June 1429. An army conisting of English, Welsh and loyalist French troops along with soliders supplied by Emperor Sigismund engaged the smaller and battered army of the self-proclaimed Charles VII.

Utlimately, Charles' death during the battle as well as the death of the Count of Armagnac, strengthened Henry's hold on the French crown and led to the surrender of the remaining rebellious vassals in the south of the kingdom. The subsequent treaty signed at the site of the battle remains one of the most important documents of the fifteenth century.

Battle of Vienne (1429)
Artistic rendition of the battle (c.1602)
 
Date 4 June 1429
Location Vienne, Dauphiné Viennois
Result Decisive Angevin victory
Belligerents
Leaders and commanders
Strength
  • Roughly 15,000
  • Over 8,000
Casualties and losses
  • 273–312 knights
  • Roughly 1500 other infantrymen
  • Only 442 knights and 3,018 other infantrymen are recored to have died; a majority of Charles' forces surrendered after the king's death

The battle


Forces belonging to Thomas arrived in battle area not long after morning. A contingent of heavy men-at-arms, mostly French and Normans, laid in hiding from Charles' army.